The Nicest Kids In Town

By: Paige Montgomery

This year’s production of the musical Hairspray is sure to be a hit. In fact, every performance is almost sold out.

The musical is always a big hit because there are so many people involved in the show. Each year, the musical is the perfect culmination of the entire performing arts: band, orchestra, choir, theater, and technical theater.

“They are extremely talented. I couldn’t have done half the things they are doing right now,” said senior Leanna Chae, a flautist in the pit orchestra of the other students in the production.

Despite the massive numbers who come to see the show every year, many people have no idea how much effort goes into the whole process.

“It's a time suck. It's a huge time suck,” commented senior Jake Rodgers, who plays Wilbur Turnblad, the main character’s father.

Those involved in the musical have not been going home until 8 or 9 o clock for the past couple of weeks. The musical itself has been in progress since September with the time commitment per day slowly lengthening as it gets closer to opening night.

“When it came out, it was just about inclusivity, breaking down barriers between races, and showing that there is nothing that you are dealt that you can’t change, that should prevent you from being treated just like everybody else,” said Rodgers.

“I’m unbelievably stressed,” added senior Jessie Rathbun, who is playing the main character Tracy Turnblad. “Last night we went to 9:30, and I didn’t have a chance to eat dinner because I was never off stage and didn’t get a break.”

Participating in the musical forces many to learn how to manage their time effectively.

“The main problem is balancing time with schoolwork, the musical and personal things,” said Chae.

Despite the hardships of the show, many veterans come back to participate throughout their years at Grandview.

“This is what we we do,” said Rodgers of the musical.

One common reason many upperclassmen cited as their reason for coming back was the camaraderie developed when working toward one goal.

“Last year, I met a lot of cool people that I’m really close to today,” said Chae. “I really like the close community that we have built.”

Others were drawn to the musical for different reasons.

“I like the attention,” said Rathbun.

When telling me this, Rathbun called herself “terrible” for wanting the attention, but in reality, it is a major part of the musical as every person there is showing off their talents for the enjoyment of other people.

Rodgers pointed out that Hairspray itself has a fantastic message for its viewers and was part of what drew him to the show itself.

“When it came out, it was just about inclusivity, breaking down barriers between races, and showing that there is nothing that you are dealt that you can’t change, that should prevent you from being treated just like everybody else,” said Rodgers.

With all the work that has been put in to the show, the final performances are almost here.

“I hope the audience gets all the little jokes in it, and all the humor, and has fun watching it,” said sophomore Cara Guydish, a cellist in the pit orchestra.

Of everybody I talked to, they all said the work and time commitment are worth it.

“I feel that we are all a group of talented people and I just hope that we can share our talents with other people,” said Chae.

 

Grandview’s performance of Hairspray is on November 15, 16, and 17 at 7:00 PM. For tickets visit http://www.grandviewperformingarts.org/ .

Leave a reply